FTI.3 | Napoli and its volcanic tuffs: cavities and monuments

Millions of people in the world live in cities at risk from volcanic eruptions, mostly for soil fertility and abundance of volcanic rocks which are good building materials. The Neapolitan area has been inhabited for a very long time, as shown by archaeological excavations which have brought to light evidence of the presence of people living in Napoli since Eneolithic times. The development of an organized society in the Neapolitan area began with the settlement of Greek colonies (VI-V century BC). The landscape of the city of Napoli has been modelled by tens of thousands of years of volcanic activity, largely by high-magnitude caldera-forming eruptions, low-energy cone-forming events and a few lava domes. The volcanic rocks used as building stones in the Neapolitan area are lavas, various types of tuff, mostly Campanian Ignimbrite and Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, and loose pyroclastic deposits. These materials have been extracted from underground and open quarries since the Greek-Roman times. The aim of this field trip is to illustrate the close relationship between the volcanic history of Napoli and its geology, clearly visible through the underground cavities and urban cultural heritage. The itinerary will start, at the end of Posillipo hill, where it is possible to observe the Trentaremi Tuff rim mantled by the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (NYT). Then we enter in the 770 m long Seiano tunnel, cuttein both NYT and Trentaremi products. AtFotthoedieSntdefaonfo tBhreantcuannel we visit the imperial complex of Pausyllipon. From the Pausyllipon terraces is possible to observe the cala Trentaremi and Punta del Cavallo pyroclastic successions. After the lunch, the fieldtrip continues in the central neapolitan districts with a visit to some of the most important monuments of the Historic City Center of Napoli, inscribed in 1995 in the UNESCO World Heritage list. This will be an occasion to observe architecture ranging from Angevin times (13th century) to the most recent decades and visit outstanding examples built with local volcanic stones, such as Piperno and Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. The final stop leads to a large archaeological excavation showing the ancient remains of Greco-Roman Neapolis, located under San Lorenzo church and buried by ancient volcanoclastic sediments. Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. The final stop leads to a large archaeological excavation showing the ancient remains of Greco-Roman Neapolis, located under San Lorenzo church and buried by ancient volcanoclastic sediments.

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